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http://conrema.org/sample-project

Shining a light on new technologies

Once you've joined as a member, you can log in and explore the various projects highlighting renewable energy technologies in the project database. If you haven't yet registered on the site, you can visit the sample page to get a taste of a project listing.

http://conrema.org/section/join-conrema

Join CONREMA

Our members enjoy various opportunities for linking up, exploring synergies and estbalishing partnerships. Through their member profile in the capacity database, their contributions and experience can be presented to other stakeholders in the sector.

http://conrema.org/section/about-conrema

Working to address energy poverty

Fighting energy poverty means improved health, better education, less environmental degradation and increased economic activity and income. Learn about CONREMA's leading role in tackling this important issue.

Malawi Energy Sector & Policy News

(For all scanned articles under this category, please click on the article title and use the ctrl and +  buttons on your keyboard to zoom the picture.)

"Power outages man-made"

It has become easy, in the wake of incessant power outages, to blame the Electricity supply Corporation of Malawi (Escom) and its twin sister Electricity Generation Company (Egenco) for everything thats goes wrong in this country.

"The Distribution Project That will Increase Access to Electricity"

Last week, we took you through the need and strengthen its power transmission network. It is clear that currently, as a nation, we cannot talk about increasing generation when our transmission network is weak. it is also important to note that ESCOM cannot connect more customers to the national grid partly because of the weak distribution network, which includes substations and transmission and distribution line.

"Nico outlines threats to economy"

Investment management and advisory firm, Nico Asset Managers, says high levels of government debt, coupled with unreliable power supply, continue to pose major risks to the country’s growth prospects.

The development comes at a time Malawi is experiencing its worst power crisis in history, with power outages lasting over 12 hours in some areas.

The development has choked private sector operations, with many firms resorting to costly diesel propelled generators just to remain in business.

"Blackouts negatively hit small businesses"

Prevailing and prolonged power outages in the country are negatively impacting on micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) who have expressed concern that their businesses are almost dying.

Currently, the Electricity Generation Company (Egenco)—that sells power to the Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi (Escom)—is only generating 160 megawatts (MW) of electricity against the average demand of 300MW, due to low water levels in the Shire River, which harbours 90 percent of Egenco’s hydro-electric power plants.

"Smoky kitchens: Malawi's cooking crisis"

Simple energy technologies can save lives and trees when made accessible, JAMES CHAVULA writes.

Going up Kuchawe Peak on Zomba Plateau, we saw how women and children are bearing the brunt of energy poverty in Malawi.

On the narrow, winding road, groups staggered under the weight of lengthy, bulky bundles of firewood.

For Mary Makwinja, who lives in the populous slum of Chikanda in Zomba City, this is an everyday burden that being one of millions of Malawians without better energy alternatives entails.

"CSOs give Escom, Egenco until January to improve"

CIVIL Society Organisations yesterday gave Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi (Escom) and Electricity Generation Company (Egenco) officials until January to address problems of power outages being experienced in the country.  The warning comes after the power utility firms revealed that, this month, power outages will go for over 25 hours, as generation capacity dwindles. [...]

"When blackouts become good governance issue"

Friday, October 27 2017. As early as 08:30am, Members of Parliament (MP) from Zomba District trek to the council's chamber, angry that they see no end in sight the problem of power outages. Less than 100 kilometres away, the Shire River— the source of water for the country's utility power supplier, the Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi (Escom) — flows freely. The river, through its water, which it taps from Lake Malawi, powers the turbines at Tedzani, Nkula A and Nkula B hydro-electric power stations on the Shire. The power generated lights homes.

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